Small Comforts: The Many Advantages of Apartment Living

Written by Sally Perkins

When it comes time to retire, many of us oftentimes think this means finally moving to our dream home. However, while this dream may seem feasible in our minds, it might not make sense financially to sign onto another long-term mortgage payment. Rather, renting an apartment may be the best choice for living out your retirement.

Apartment living not only gives you the opportunity to rent, downsize and save money, but it has a range of advantages for people who have retired. Many retirees will be happy to learn that selling a home and renting will present an opportunity to earn capital that produces an income. Besides being a great option financially, here are some other benefits of choosing a small, comforting space for your retirement:

Let the Maintenance Team Do the Hard Work

With more than two-thirds of Americans leaving the workforce by age 66, retirees are not always of an age that want to be doing yard work and making home repairs. One of the undeniable benefits to renting modern accommodation is that many apartment complexes come with a maintenance team. This eliminates the issue of having to keep up with tedious tasks like raking leaves, mowing the lawn or shoveling snow.

Plus—who really wants to be doing that kind of hard work when you’re retired, anyway? Retirement is a well-deserved time to finally relax and not work. By having a maintenance team on hand any time something in the apartment goes wrong, breaks or needs repair is an extremely convenient feature for retirees, as it greatly reduces any anxiety over performing these tasks on one’s own.

Plenty of Privacy with Company Nearby

Another bonus of apartment living during your retirement years is the small comforts and privacy that come with downsizing. With less space to fill with your things and fewer rooms to clean, you will be more appreciative of the things you value and cherish most. Since we all crave privacy, this is a great option, as it offers the chance to put your personal touches on a smaller space.

At the same time, living in an apartment complex gives you plenty of new neighbors. By living in close proximity to other people who are a similar stage in life as you, you can easily seek out new social activities and meet new friends. Especially in complexes that are only for retirement-age individuals or couples, there will be many opportunities to interact with your other neighbors, which is important to avoid feelings of isolation.

In addition to the handy maintenance team and added privacy of apartment living, retirees have the chance to make friends with like-minded people and enjoy all of the comforts of downsizing to a rented space.

Investing and Spending – Enjoying Your Retirement

Written by Sally Perkins

Retirement and the associated saving is a source of anxiety for many people. You spend an entire lifetime working and trying to take the stress out of retirement funding; so, where’s the fun in continuing to stress and worry once you’re actually there? Of course, it’s never actually as simple as stopping your worry.

This article will shed some light on the best ways to build and manage your retirement fund to reduce your anxiety over saving to the absolute minimum level. Then, keep reading to see some of the best ways to spend your money to really enjoy the years of job-free freedom – without breaking the bank – and whilst also keeping yourself healthy.

Preparing – How To

The United States has basic retirement benefits available for those once they reach the prerequisite age. These reach up to around $15,000 and provide a basic income to those in need. However, the federal government recommends you aim for 80% of your income in retirement. So, if you’re someone who earns $100k a year, you’ll need $80k to continue our quality of life. How do you achieve that?

Unlike some other countries in Europe, the USA has no mandate of employers to provide pensions. This leads many employers to offer up-front salary improvements and bonuses in place of pension contributions – which is a good or a bad thing, depending on your self-control. The AAA Credit Guide (https://aaacreditguide.com) suggests vehicles such as the Roth IRA provide a far superior saving environment – and one you control – as opposed to many company led pension schemes.

The big benefit of the Roth IRA is that it takes away future tax burden and obligations, which can give relief when you’ve reached retirement age. You can super-charge your pension by taking out personal investment plans in addition to the IRA, or running one alongside an employer-sponsored 401K.

Enjoying Yourself

Once you hit retirement and have access to your fund, either as a lump sum or as a dividend-style trust arrangement, it falls on you to moderate it properly. This is where some stumble finding themselves unable to exercise the correct level of self-control when adapting to 100% free time from a 9-5 job or similar. For this purpose, consider employing the dynamic spending and saving strategy to keep a firm grip on your economic situation.

With that in mind, you might be thinking – what can I enjoy? What hobbies exist that will bring enrichment and stimulation whilst remaining relatively frugal?

Model Construction

Airfix planes and LEGO style buildings may seem to be things of your childhood. However, the companies touting these products are actually targeting and directed towards generations above just ‘kids’. In fact, LEGO attribute some success to ‘mature’ sets following the downward trend of their brand. These sets aren’t bank-breaking and the customization can offer years of enjoyment for minimal outlay. Models and airfix-style can even benefit your health. The tasks are often relaxing, stimulating your mind and demanding concentration. They can also help with motor skills, which can fall by the wayside in retirement.

Geocaching

Geocaching is a very 21st century hobby that involves little more than a set of maps and any rudimentary GPS device. People all over the world have spent time to hide trinkets and treasure around their countries, posting treasure maps online to lead fellow community members on an entertaining trail. Many contributors specifically pick picturesque trails or tricky clues and navigation methods, and encourage the treasure hunters to detail their journeys and share them online.

These digital treasure hunts mean that you can get involved with a community and make new friends online. Furthermore, you’ll probably earn a good bit of exercise getting to the remote places and if you have a camera in hand – likely as geocaching can be done with your phone – get some spectacular shots of nature.

Martial Arts

Finally there is martial arts. Martial arts is often free, if not subject to small donations to your chosen place of practice. They are again a great way to get out and about, and don’t require a huge level of physical fitness. Martial arts are typically about turning force against itself – acting as a pivot against the strength of other people. Getting involved is a great way to stay healthy physically, and most disciplines have an edge of mental well being too, integrating their rigorous martial arts mentality with strengths plucked from eastern spiritualism.

The financial planning aspect of retirement can be time consuming – even boring. However, the options are there for you to make a success of yourself. And once you retire, there are many inexpensive ways to enjoy yourself and build skills whilst maintaining your health, leaving your hard-earned career cash for the rainy days and big trips ahead.

Make Your Retirement a Healthy One

Guest Post by Joseph Byrne, Founder and CEO of EmpoweredAge.com, a service that connects highly-skilled retirees to part-time or short-term consulting projects in various industries. Below, Mr. Byrne offers his insight into working after retirement and the gap he aims to fill.

Our idea of retirement has changed with each passing generation. Many people count down the days until they can relax with no time-constraints, play golf, visit family and friends, and take the trip they have put off for years. Others find their true passion in their work, committed to continue working as long as their health allows. Still others look forward to volunteering, taking on a second-career, or pursuing a passion project that has eluded them. Often, these visions change during our retirement years after finishing the initial “retirement honeymoon” phase. Retirement can have many different visions to different people; but it does not have to have just one.

As the baby boomer generation is retiring in record numbers (some 10,000 per day), there are millions who are contemplating their next move. Financially, many retirees are not prepared to completely discontinue a regular income, but do not need their full annual salary to feel comfortable. For many, working in retirement is not a burden that interferes with more desirable activities. On the contrary, working in a capacity that allows retirees flexibility, the chance to keep their skills sharp, an opportunity to maintain continued connection with colleagues, all while earning additional retirement income, is a highly fulfilling and prosperous endeavor.

According to research by Merrill Lynch and Age Wave, 47% of retirees say they are either working or plan to work in retirement. This figure increases with people who are actually still working full-time: 72% say they plan to work in some fashion in retirement. Millions of retirees with years of experience, contacts, and expertise are underutilized; their knowledge simply sits on the sidelines. Part-time, value-added work opportunities seem to only exist for the select few via personal networks.

As I spoke with many highly-educated and highly-trained retirees, this stalemate seemed to be a common thread. There was certainly no shortage of useful experience, and furthermore, after a number of conversations with Human Resources representatives, many firms actually sought out this arrangement to help complete short-term and/or particularly challenging projects. It was after a number of these interactions that my team and I decided to create Empowered Age. We formed our hypothesis around this inefficiency and our directive was simple: bridge the gap between retirees and firms who desire to tap into their wealth of experience. After some market research and testing, Empoweredage.com was born.

There are a number of websites that cater to retirees looking to work after their “formal” retirement. Many of these services, however, list mostly hourly or manual labor openings. Empowered Age aims to take this a step further, targeting retirees with years of highly skilled experience that can provide exceptional value to a growing firm. Many of these arrangements are projects to help launch a new product, oversee a new office opening, or advise on a new sales strategy.

In our experience, the feedback we have collected has overwhelmingly confirmed our suspicions. First, that there are a significant number of firms looking to engage in this sort of employment arrangement. But more importantly, the retirees or semi-retirees who are eager to fill these roles report a deep renewal of value, continued social status that was familiar during their full-time working years, and a satisfaction in using their knowledge to help drive growth in their organization. In addition, although we did not initially anticipate, firms have been eager to support initiatives that drive inclusion and diversity as it relates to age. This has been an unexpected by-product that we proudly boast.

Moreover, there are encouraging studies that suggest working later in life – and past the “typical” retirement age – can actually be a significant health benefit. This New York Times Article quotes Columbia and Harvard University Professors regarding the mental and physical health benefits of working in retirement as well as the delay of negative retirement consequences such as fatigue and loss of concentration. In fact, researchers from Cornell and Syracuse Universities found that people who continued to work after formal retirement grew their network of family and friends by 25 percent! On the other hand, social networks of retired non-working people actually shrank during the 5-year study period. The study continues, “Work offers a routine and purpose, a reason for getting up in the morning. The workplace is a social environment, a community.”

In this article for The Today Show, author Jean Chatzky writes that researchers from Oregon State University studied a large group of individuals age 50 and over. The researchers found that people who worked past the age of 65 had an 11% lower chance of death from all causes. Ms. Chatzky continues to quote a survey of 80,000 participants from the National Health Interview all over the age of 65: “People in the workforce (particularly those with white-collar jobs) were significantly more likely to report their health was good, very good or excellent than those who were unemployed or retired.” In the countless hours of research we have conducted as noted above, this completely matches what we have found.

Whatever your idea of retirement may be, planning will be an important part. Whether that be financially, geographically, professionally, or socially, be aware to engage in activities that provide value to you. Look for opportunities that benefit your intellectual as well as your physical health. Wherever your journey takes you, we wish you health and success. If part-time consulting work is in that journey, Empowered Age will help you along the way. Visit us at Empowered Age for more information.

Joseph can be reached at joseph.byrne@empoweredage.com. Please follow on twitter @EmpoweredAge.