Experience the Joy of Patience in Retirement

As a survivor of a Bay Area based career it is not always easy to slow things down despite my enviable retired status. Old habits die hard and decades of hustling to the next event or jetting down the freeway toward another oh-so-important meeting impacted the person I was and influenced the lifestyle I lived. Everything was so fast. While in the midst of my career I honestly felt guilty taking a moment to escape the busy day. There was always something I could be doing, something I should be doing.

Now that I am retired I am beginning to understand not everything need proceed at turbo speed. It is okay to pursue the day at a sane pace. And it is much easier to appreciate and tune into the world around if moments are not flashing by at the speed of light.

In the Bay Area, heavy traffic is a fact of life. If you are on the road you expect to proceed at slower than posted speed limits in all but the rarest of times. As congestion increases everywhere, there is no longer any non-rush hour time to journey out. I never got used to the traffic. I would prefer to drive twice the distance so long as my car kept moving. Waiting, burning gas, watching the minutes tick by – it wound me up like a watch.

Where my wife and I retired there is no real rush hour traffic or at least nothing like what we were accustomed. There are a few stretches of highway that back up at various times of the day. But as I learn to be patient in retirement I am able to better deal with these delays. Perhaps it is because I am no longer pressured to be somewhere at a specific time. I sit back and remember how things are just 70 miles away and smile broadly. “This is rush hour traffic I can handle just fine!!”

Being patient is not always easy. If you are an active retiree there is nothing worse than sustaining an injury that sidelines from your normal pursuits. Exercise keeps us limber, engaged and out there living. I know that if I miss more than a few days I start to get a bit testy. My wife notes this as well and thank God for her patience!

As the aging game plays forward it doesn’t take something big to knock you out of circulation. A minor tweak of the knee and you end up unable to take your daily walk. A few months ago I tried a new yoga pose to relieve a little back/hip pain. Unfortunately I did it incorrectly and now two months later my elbow is a painful reminder to do it right or don’t do it at all. I haven’t returned to my normal workout routine and it drives me crazy. But I know how important patience is when it comes to recovering from injury, even more so entering my sixth decade. I am letting time mend me, doing what I can around the injury to stay active, optimistic I will be back before too long. And when I am, look out!

Throughout life we will run into situations that test our patience. We all have our hot buttons, triggers that quickly set us into orbit. Where traffic is my personal bane others may feel challenged when forced to engage in mindless small talk or tolerate barking dogs at night or enduring those ever so slow grocery clerks.

When I feel my tension level rise I try to consciously slow down. I take a few slow, deep breaths to help bring my heart rate back to normal. I put a smile on my face to help put things in perspective. Most importantly I remind myself where I am in life – retired from the rat race, free to spend my days as I choose to, able to proceed at a reasonable pace, no longer burdened by must-have-an-answer-now decisions. Feeling in control of my days is a blessing.

Sure I get a little impatient on occasion. But I am learning what matters and what does not. I try to overlook the annoying little things, to focus my time and energy on what matters and what I enjoy. Living in that state there is no cause to hurry. I savor my freedom and appreciate the moments I am fortunate enough to live.

LoveBeingRetired.com

Preparing Your House to Accommodate Seniors with Limited Mobility

Written by Becky Wilcox

Mobility challenges are quite common among the elderly. If you are the primary caregiver for a senior family member who is experiencing this difficulty, it is critical that you do your best to help them cope with these limitations. One way is to make your home “elderly-friendly” for a safer and more accessible environment for aging adults.

Making upgrades/additions to your home to make it safe and secure for older folks can be as simple as installing handrails near the staircase. This senior home preparation guide focuses on simple investments for creating a haven. That said, it also recommends more substantial installations that can be worthwhile if your loved one ends up having long-term mobility issues.

Here’s what you can do:

  1. Create a Comfortable Sitting Environment 

Sitting in a comfortable position can prove to be a challenge for mobility impaired seniors. The standard chairs present in most homes can take a toll on their back. On top of that, older folks may struggle to get back into a standing position without assistance. Fortunately, modern lift recliners and other similar options are allowing caregivers and homeowners to set up comfortable seating areas in their accommodations. Furniture pieces like these include all the latest features (dual motors, massage, heating, etc.) that allow for versatility in how users maneuver them. For example, they can achieve a fully reclined position as well as be positioned straight. Moreover, some of them are capable of helping seniors stand on their feet by giving them the boost they need to get comfortably up on their feet.

  1. Add Safety Features to Your Bathroom

Your bathroom is especially important to secure since water increases the risk of slip and fall injuries. Roll-in pathways, curtain equipped shower stalls, and seating are some viable options for the seniors in your home don’t use a wheelchair. Investments like these remove the need to step over a tub or ledge, significantly reducing the risk of falling. Another washroom safety measure is to replace one of your existing bathtubs with a walk-in model. That’ll give your mobility impaired loved one the safety and confidence they need to bathe on their own. Additionally, you can put pads and non-slip pads at the bottom to offer better traction inside. As for the bath sink, countertop versions are the most secure option for access and support. The can be adjusted in the same manner as the kitchen. For homeowners with a free-standing sink, it’s a good idea to install an “L” bracket in the wall stud to remove the risks associated with leaning on it.

  1. Reorganize the Kitchen

Incorporate at least one accessible workplace in the kitchen that seniors can access, be it a fold-down table or a small dining set. Just make sure it can bear a considerable amount of weight. The workspace should also be able to accommodate frequently used items. Ensure these are accessible throughout the kitchen, as reaching for things in high cabinets could lead to injuries. Also, controls should be present in front of the stove to prevent seniors needing to reach across burners. Additionally, appliances and cookware with sensory alerts – like kitchen appliances with both lights and sounds and whistling ovens – are must-haves for homes with older adults.

Make sure the elders with mobility issues always feel safe and welcome by taking note of the arrangements they need. Start by making these upgrades to make seniors appreciate your home as well as life in general.

Top Ten Healthy Habits to Help Seniors Age in Place

Written by James Fleming

If you’ve never really prioritized health before, you may think it’s too late now that you’ve retired or are about to retire. In reality, though, it’s never too late and in fact, your health matters more now than ever before.

The sooner you start implementing healthy habits, the longer you are likely live and the greater your quality of life will be. Even if you’re currently struggling with pain or an illness, these ten habits can help reduce your symptoms and allow you to continue aging in place.

1. Take a Daily Multivitamin
Micronutrient deficiencies are common among senior citizens, and the deficiencies seem to get worse as age increases. A daily multivitamin is a great tool that you can use to avoid the health risks that come from these deficiencies.

A daily multivitamin contributes to one’s overall health and is especially beneficial for days when you under eat or simply don’t eat as healthfully as you’d like.

2. Get an Annual Physical
If you’re relying on Medicare, you’re entitled to a free physical during the first twelve months. After that, you receive a free annual wellness visit.

Be sure to take advantage of these free visits to make sure you’re staying on top of your health. If you are suffering from any illness, you’ll be able to catch it earlier. Your doctor will also be able to let you know if you are at risk of developing any specific diseases.

3. Prioritize Prevention
Preventative care visits — such as health screenings and vaccinations — are almost always covered by Medicare as well. Take advantage of these screenings and vaccines to ensure you’re keeping illness at bay and catching any issues that might be present early on.

4. Let Go of What You Can’t Control
Research shows that the people who live the longest are typically those who do not dwell on the difficulties they may be facing. Being able to manage stress and let go of the things that are out of your control is good for your physical and mental well-being. Mindfulness practices like meditation, yoga, and tai chi are great for helping you improve your ability to stop internalizing things you can’t change.

5. Visit the Dentist Twice a Year
As you age, your risk of cavities increases. Mouth infections have also been linked to a variety of chronic and serious conditions, including heart disease, stroke, and diabetes. To prevent these and maintain good oral health, regular dentist visits (every six months) are a good idea.

6. Keep Your Mental Health in Check
Mental health is another essential component of a high quality of life. Many seniors struggle with depression and anxiety. Work on maintaining a positive attitude and try to find friends or family members with whom you can share your worries or problems. Keeping these things bottled up will only make your depression or anxiety worse.

7. Exercise Regularly
Regular exercise will also help keep depression and anxiety at bay. It’s also just good for overall health. Seniors who exercise regularly are less likely to experience falls, and, if you struggle with arthritis or chronic pain, you may also find that it helps alleviate your symptoms.

8. Eat a Healthy Diet
Taking a multivitamin is important, but remember that it’s a supplement — it shouldn’t replace your consumption of fruits, vegetables, and high-quality animal products. To maintain your health and age in place, a healthy and balanced diet is essential. Be sure to also drink plenty of water to prevent dehydration.

9. Get Plenty of Sleep
Many seniors struggle with insomnia or poor quality sleep. Make sure your bedroom is dark, quiet, and cool to promote better rest. You can also use natural sleep aids to help you get plenty of shut-eye (prescription sleep aids should be a last resort, as they can cause dizziness and increase your risk of falls).

10. Stay Connected
Finally, make sure you’re spending time with people you love on a regular basis. Friends, children, grandchildren — they all can help you feel connected and make it easier for you to maintain a positive attitude. This, in turn, will lengthen your lifespan and improve your quality of life.