Discover Your Passion

Are You Just Existing and Calling it a Life?

“For those who want to find real value in their personal lives, this book will help refocus their direction and help them to get on a journey that is truly important.” Ernie Zelinski, Author of “How to Retire Happy, Wild and Free”

Our passions define us, inspire us, empower us and ultimately give our lives meaning and purpose beyond merely existing. But too many people have resigned themselves to accepting life rather than grabbing for all they can. Their existence is made up of boring and uninspired day-to-day routines offering no true fulfillment with no end in sight.

Rather than just existing, instead of merely accepting life we have the power to choose to pursue what matters most to us. But to do so we need to find and follow our individual passion.

Hear what readers are saying about the book:

“I wish this book were around years ago. The 5-8 years I toyed with what the next step would be could have been shaved to about one year.”

“The book confirmed for me that it is time to pursue my interests and passions, not just continue on the path that is secure and helps pay the bills. I am so much happier now because I am pursuing my passion.”

 ”Thanks to this author, I was able to see positive elements that exist in my life today and recognizing opportunities for improvement.”

  • Learn how to better understand the roots of passion through examples and personal experiences shared by others who have found their passion
  • Uncover what drives passion in others and see how that may trigger your own discovery.
  • Discover specific ways to define and follow what inspires you, what turns you on and what can make every day worth living.
  • Find out how you can personally empower your passion to find purpose.

“This is a valuable resource for anyone seeking more spark in any arena of life, whether personal, career, or retirement.” Andy Landis, Author of “When I Retire”

By understanding the source of these passions and identifying specific steps to empower each we can hope to take the first steps toward generating a blueprint of our purpose and the life we could be and should be living.

Why settle for less?

Available NOW at Amazon and Barnes & Noble

 

Recent Posts

How One Couple Prepares to Retire Together

As my wife and I grow ever nearer retirement, we are excited about our future together. It has been a long road but we are just about there. Here’s the current situation – my wife works for a start up managing all aspects of the office along with doing her best to assure the various employees play well together. She is wonderful at her job and although not always a cake walk, enjoys the interaction with co-workers and energy that a small business perpetuates. Prior to the last two years, I also worked in the technology start up arena managing various sales teams. Never a dull moment as we drove hard to achieve our goals and then reset at the beginning of each new month.

These last two years I have been “free” from work as the next gig has not materialized and in all honesty is not likely to. I am 55 which is about a century too old for the typical start up where average ages are lower than my children (ouch). But rather than bitch and moan, I am looking ever forward. I know that in the next few years – be that one or five or somewhere in between – my wife and I will retire. We look forward to spending quality time together doing what we want with our days free from stress and just plain happy to be alive.

As big believers in planning ahead, my wife and I have been discussing how we will retire together and not drive each other crazy.

Sharing our individual visions of retirement

Since we are unique people it makes sense that we do not have exactly the same view of our retirement-to-be. So we talk about it. We have identified some of our shared visions as well as areas in which we differ. Here is where I believe we are on the right track – although we have some differing views of retirement, we are not trying to reshape or change one another (probably a good thing since at our age we are pretty set in our ways). Instead we do our best to support and encourage each other to pursue the retirement that is most desired. And having uncovered no real clashes in our visions, the road ahead looks relatively smooth (he said optimistically).

My wife is the more social of us and enjoys spending time with others at dinners and events. She is also most happy when she keeps busy. It is possible that her fulfilling retirement may include a part time job to occupy perhaps half of the day. In this role she can interact with co-workers as well as stay engaged and active. Although I like people just fine, I have no problem pursuing activities alone or with just her as opposed to getting out and about (and after 30 years in the Bay Area, I HATE traffic and crowds with a passion). With the past two years of “practice retirement” under my belt, I have created an enjoyable routine that occupies me until about 4:00 each afternoon. The good news is I still have one hour to add something new before cocktails!

Doing things together as well as apart

My wife and I love to do things together. We travel whenever we can, hike every hill in our vicinity, happily wander the countryside in search of that perfect loaf of bread or Pinot Noir, share a quiet moment reading side by side, and typically end the day perched in the best spot to watch the sunset. We are blessed in that we do not have to be doing something every moment. Even if we are doing different things being near each other works just fine. And although we share many common interests, we also support the pursuit of our individual hobbies. We agree it is healthy to have time apart just as much as time together. While she puzzles – either jigsaw or Sudoku or crossword – I write my next blog. When she reads a book while catching a bit of sun in the backyard, I fiddle around in the garden to make it just so. We do things together and we do things apart and the mix works for us

Talking about what lies ahead

The reality is we are getting older. How that will roll out for us over the coming years remains to be seen. But we see our friends and family moving up in years and witness the impact first hand. We are optimistic but also realistic. Already the little aches and pains are making their presence known. Those knees we took for granted as we ran those many miles in our youth will have their say. Hikes we aggressively undertook up steep hills need to be tempered a bit as stamina is not what it used to be. The volume on the TV is a bit louder and the heat in the house a bit higher. It isn’t easy but trying to ignore reality is a losing proposition. We are trying to accept aging gracefully, making the best of it and adjusting our lifestyle accordingly. And we are far from done as we plan on doing all we can along the way to make the best of our second act together.

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