Remodeling Your Home For Retirement

Written by Sally Perkins

As you head towards retirement, one of the questions you will face is: What do I do with my home? Do I move or downsize? Is this home right for my changing needs? A rising number of senior homeowners prefer to age in place, and their reasons hold a lot of validity. Continued independence and the comfort/sentimentality of a family home are two very understandable reasons why retirees would want to stay in their homes. However, just as your finances need to be prepared for retirement, so should your home. Taking steps to modify your home for life after retiring helps you prepare for challenges faced when transitioning to retirement, and can help you achieve that goal of independence later on in life.

Dedicate Spare Space For A Hobby Or Exercise

The physical and mental health benefits of including exercise in retirement have been well documented over the past few years. Regular exercise and activity can help to strengthen your bones and combat pain and osteoporosis. It can also improve your balance and mobility. As a result, your chances of falling are reduced. Around 1 in every 4 Americans aged 65 and older fall annually, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. In addition, taking up a hobby such as hiking, painting or pottery not only helps you stay active in retirement but can help you maintain good brain health.

By the time you approach retirement age, chances are that most of your children will have moved on, either to college or into a home of their own. Retirement is the prime period where seniors wonder if it is time to downsize – possibly due to the now vacant space. Instead, you can turn empty bedrooms into an at-home gym or hobby studio. If you are short on space, you can also consider creating a basement gym, although the stairs may become tricky as you age. This is a minimal change remodeling idea. Most times, the structure of the home does not need to be changed, and minor changes such as painting and window installations to help control ventilation and lighting. For states like Arizona where temperatures can rise, larger or more windows can provide much-needed relief.

Lower Floor Access To An En-Suite

You may want to consider moving your master bedroom downstairs or creating a new guest suite so that your living quarters are not on split levels. Ranch homes and their single level open floor plans are already popular in states such as Texas and Georgia. With the concept being quite common in Texas, many contractors that offer Austin home remodeling services or remodeling in other cities will be well versed in recommending the ideal open floor remodeling changes needed for your home. In the event you do not currently have space downstairs, this may call for an extension. Remodeling’s Cost Vs Value Report showed a master suite addition can add $69,807 to your resale value. For those with space, the remodeling may include repurposing rooms into a new master bedroom. 

Updating Your Kitchen And Bathroom Floors

Another remodeling idea for those entering the retirement phase of their lives is to switch out their flooring. Flooring choices combined with declining mobility or strength often result in falls. Around 20 percent of falls result in a serious head injury or broken bones. Making the switch early on has two purposes: it helps to prepare for and avoid slips, and it can improve the value of your home. Coming up to retirement and after raising a family, floors can take a lot of wear and tear. 

If you have been in your home long term, your flooring materials such as carpets may be at the end of their useful life. When choosing a replacement, go for an option that is easy to maintain/clean, accessible even with mobility aids, and slip-resistant like Coretec Plus or Cork Flooring. Consult with a remodeler, who will be able to advise you on the best options for anti-slip flooring in your kitchen and bathrooms. In the bathroom, electric under tile heating is another change to be considered. They may also suggest the installation of grabs bars near the shower, and swapping your toilet or shower to a walk-in shower. 

Aging at home has many benefits. It minimizes changes and offers security. However, you do need to prepare your home for retirement and all that comes with it. Investing in certain home remodels before you do enter retirement can not only boost your home market value, but will ensure that your home is the best-suited option for your changing needs.

How to Stay Healthy in Old Age

Written by Joel Dodds

As we get older, the importance of staying healthy and looking after our minds and bodies increases. With older age comes a higher likelihood of being affected by diseases like stroke, heart disease and diabetes, all of which we can prevent with the right approach to diet and lifestyle.

Living a healthier lifestyle during your retirement years can help you to cut back on expensive medical costs and live a happier and lower-stress life. Here are some simple steps to follow if you want to learn how to stay healthy in old age:

1.       Practice healthy eating habits

Eating the right foods can be more challenging as you get older, especially if you have a disability that makes shopping for food or home-cooking fresh meals more difficult. Old age may also bring changes to your metabolism and appetite that simply make eating less appealing. However, it’s incredibly important to eat a diet of high protein, fibre, vitamins and minerals if you want to stay at your healthiest. Ask a friend or family member for support if you need help preparing meals.

2.       Get your sleep

Getting older is a funny thing: you seem to want to sleep less at night, then find yourself napping sporadically throughout the day. This random sleeping cycle might not be the best thing for your health, so it’s worth reassessing your current sleeping habits and focusing on getting more shuteye during the night-time hours. If your mattress is an issue, look for the best mattress for seniors and make the investment.

3.       Socialise and enjoy life

No matter what your age, poor mental health can significantly affect not only your lifespan, but your quality of life. It’s easier to become isolated with old age, and you may be faced with a number of challenges, like poor physical health and losing a loved one. However, channelling your inner mental strength is important, even while it might feel hard. Reach out to family and friends, and make sure to stay sociable. Take up new hobbies and make the most out of life.

4.       Stay active

It’s natural that as you get older, you might not fancy a jog around the block every morning (although good for you if you do!). It’s often better to respect your current physical condition and go for an activity that’s more appropriate for you, such as a walk in the park, swimming, or practicing yoga, which has been found to have a positive effect on hypertension in seniors. Consult your GP before taking up a new exercise regimen.

5.       Train your brain

Just like our bodies still need physical exercise when we’re older, so do our brains. Older age brings with it the increased risk of cognitive disorders like Alzheimer’s, and keeping your brain active can help prevent mental degeneration. Give word puzzles and crosswords a go if you feel like you’re spending too much time in front of the TV. Studies have even found that regular brain exercises in older people can improve cognitive functions and working memory. 

Debunking 5 Common Retirement Myths

Written by James Clarke

While Americans know full well they have to save for retirement, many have some mistaken assumptions that could end up costing them money when they’re older. When it comes to crucial aspects like healthcare, for example, most couples don’t realize that they’ll need over $280,000 in retirement savings for healthcare costs. Beyond healthcare, there are many other retirement aspects that Americans are uninformed about and here we’ll cover 5 of them.

My Social Security and Pension Will Be Enough

Banking on your social security and pension to be enough to support you in retirement is a terrible misconception. When looking at the numbers, Social Security provides a third of the monthly income for most retirees at about $1,471. Despite this, 21% of retired couples and 45% of retired singles still depend on Social Security for 90% or more of their retirement income. You shouldn’t count on your pension too much either as both public and private pensions are in trouble. While some are at risk of going under, others have billions in shortfalls and won’t be paying as much as originally promised.

I Don’t Need to Plan for Retirement Just Yet

While most people know they have to start their retirement planning early they tend to put it off. CFP and financial educator, Joe Catanzarite warns that people don’t start retirement planning until it’s too late or something happens that sends them scrambling. This can lead to costly mistakes and reactionary buying of financial products that they may not need and don’t help create a plan for the future. Therefore, Catanzarite recommends you start planning early, listing your priorities and goals and seeking advice from a qualified planner.

Borrowing from My 401(k) is a Good Idea

Borrowing from your 401(k) should only be as a last resort. Investopedia notes that you could lose investment earnings on the money you’ve borrowed and repay the loan with after-tax dollars. Should you lose your job you’ll also have to repay the loan faster, during your next tax return. Thus, it’s a good idea to consider other avenues like short-term loans, or a title loan to avoid the headache of borrowing from retirement savings. With title loans in Ohio having only minimal requirements for borrowers such as a vehicle title for collateral, it’s a comparatively low-risk move compared to borrowing against your 401(k). Online options are available depending on the state, with loaners Highway Title Loans, for example, servicing borrowers in Arizona, California, New Mexico and Utah, among others. With a short-term loan, you’ll also avoid potential penalties and tax implications associated with borrowing from tax-deferred investments.

I Won’t Have as Many Expenses

For mysterious reasons many Americans believe that their living costs will magically decrease by half when they retire. In fact, they could go up. You’ll still be paying for your home when you retire, and although your mortgage may be paid off, you’ll pay for insurance and property taxes. You’ll also need transportation, food, utilities and communications. Sure, you’ll spend less on fuel because you no longer have a daily commute but your car will still need insurance and possible repairs. As we mentioned above, healthcare could even make your living costs increase. Plan for maybe a 20% to 25% reduction at most.

I’m Going to Work After Retirement

Many people expect to continue to work during their retirement and two in three expect that work will be a major or minor source of income, based on a survey by the Employee Benefit Research Institute (EBRI). In reality, only half of those can do so and the rest leave the workforce due to job loss, and disability, among others. Therefore it is important to plan to retire 3 to 5 years before you think you will and delay taking Social Security benefits for as long as possible.